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Claim damages for vaginal mesh complications

27

Apr 2017

The Guardian has reported that more than 800 women have sought compensation from the NHS and the manufacturers of vaginal mesh, as a result of having suffered serious complications.

According to the BBC, some women reported that implants had caused severe pain leaving them with problems such as being unable to walk or have sex.

The implants are used to treat incontinence after childbirth or pelvic organ prolapse, where the womb or the bladder bulges against the walls of the vagina.

Between 2006 and 2016, more than 11,000 women in England were given vaginal mesh implants to treat prolapse or incontinence. Reportedly, about one in 11 women have sought help for complications.

A study published in the Lancet in December 2016 found that women who were given mesh implants were roughly three times more likely to suffer complications and twice as likely to need follow-up surgery compared with women who had the traditional version of the surgery, where stitches are used to provide support for the organs.  

It is not clear whether patients are always aware of this when they agree to be treated using mesh implants.

The Birmingham Mail reported that around 200 patients had were called back to hospital to discuss concerns that one of its Consultants, Dr Angamuthu Arunkalaivanan had continued to use such mesh even after its use had been withdrawn by the Trust.

Rachael Wood, a consultant in public health medicine for NHS National Services Scotland and the lead author of the Lancet study, said:

“The results were quite clear that women do suffer a higher complication rate and that it is no more effective. You can make quite a clear recommendation that it shouldn’t be the first line of treatment for prolapse.”

If you've sustained complications following the se from a transvaginal mesh, do not hesitate to contact us by email or call us on 0191 5666 500.  Alternatively, fill in our short enquiry form and one of our specialist solicitors will be in touch.

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